Category Archives: Cumbria Lake District

Langdale Pikes and a walk back to Ambleside

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Langdale Pikes and a walk back to Ambleside

Even in a car full of middle-aged people, with mixed weather and an invalid on board, it is possible to experience some fantastic scenery not too far from the madding crowds of Ambleside on a half term Sunday afternoon.

Langdale Head from the road by the footpath near Blea Tarn

Langdale Head from the road by the footpath near Blea Tarn

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Therefore, a trip out to the Langdale Pikes and a walk back to Ambleside (which is only seven miles away) is a great way to spend half a day in the lake district.

A short car ride from Ambleside and you are in the heart of Langdale, surrounded by the famous Pikes, beautiful.

And if you have an invalid with you, it is possible to drive into some amazing scenery, making the distance from the car to the open world, as short as possible – so it really is possible to enjoy Langdale on one leg.

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We took a nice walk today fro Langdale back to Ambleside, only 5 or 6 miles but plenty for an out of shape bloke after a pint at the National Trust pub in Sticklebarn

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National Trust...where shall we go today?

National Trust…where shall we go today?

Langdale

Langdale

 

 

Langdale

Langdale

 

 

The walk back from the pub at Sticklebarn, via Langdale village and the new path around Elterwater was easy and rewarding – I would urge anyone with a couple of hours spare to give it a go, no hiking gear required!

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Ambleside, where it all started.

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Nice to be back in Ambleside, where it all started.

Ambleside is indeed the spot where it literally all started – the place we came to live for a week to register to get married in 1989. I am glad we did.

Good Morning Ambleside

Good Morning Ambleside

Love the lakes, even on a drab day the light at 4.40pm in february can be surprising...

Love the lakes, even on a drab day the light at 4.40pm in february can be surprising…

Ambleside is good – 30 years on!

Nice to be back in the heart of the lakes with some special friends, probably 30 years since we first stayed up here, and at least 25 since we got married up here.

Pintail Cottage is where it all started - above a fudge shop.

Pintail Cottage is where it all started – above a fudge shop.

 

In 1989 we had to live above this shop for a week to register in the area and be married at Kendal Registry Office on 19th August 1989.

This little house over the beck is still owned by the National Trust

This little house over the beck is still owned by the National Trust

Our pals booked us all in for a lovely spa day here, we did a lot of nothing and then had lunch, it was good...

Our pals booked us all in for a lovely spa day here, we did a lot of nothing and then had lunch, it was good…

Ambleside Coffee shop heaven

Ambleside Coffee shop heaven

Many things in Ambleside don’t seem to have changed, but there are certainly more coffee shops and outdoor clothing specialists than anywhere else I have been recently!

It's nice here...

It’s nice here…

Rydal Water

Rydal Water

 

A Heffalump

A Heffalump

As promised, I have some more serious pics today after heading out from Ambleside and the spa, we managed a couple of hours walking towards Rydal Hall and Nab Scar.

Rydal Water and Rydal Hall

Rydal Water is a small body of water in the central part of the English Lake District, in the county of Cumbria. It is located near the hamlet of Rydal, between Grasmere and Ambleside in the Rothay Valley.[1]

Rydal Water from the'coffin route' above Rydal Hall

Rydal Water from the’coffin route’ above Rydal Hall

The lake is 1290yd (1.18 km) long and varies in width up to a maximum of 380yd (350m), covering an area of 0.12 mi² (0.31 km²). It has a maximum depth of 65 ft (17m) and an elevation above sea level of 177 ft (54m). The lake is both supplied and drained by the river Rothay, which flows from Grasmere upstream and towards Windermere downstream.[1]

Rydal Water

The waters of the southern half of the lake are leased by the Lowther Estate to the National Trust, whilst those of the northern half belong to the estate of Rydal Hall. Navigation is prohibited, except for residents of Rydal Hall.[1]

Beautiful light on Nab Scar

Beautiful light on Nab Scar

Numerous walks are possible in the surrounding hills, as well as a walk around the lake itself, which takes in Dove Cottage and Rydal Mount, both homes to William Wordsworth, and Rydal Cave, a former quarry working. At the western end of the lake, steps lead to Wordsworth’s Seat, which is considered to have been Wordsworth’s favourite viewpoint in the Lake District.

We will be re-visiting many of our favourite walks over the coming days, and if the sun looks like shining, I will get out the big camera!

If not, I will be staying in the pub…

A whole new way of tidying up crisp packets...

A whole new way of tidying up crisp packets…

Keswick, Derwentwater and cumbrian sausages.

220 miles is a sizeable round trip for a sausage sandwich, but when its a propper cumberland, and served up by family in some of the most photogenic scenery the lakes have to offer, then its worth grabbing the camera, setting the sat nav, and hitting the road for Keswick, Derwentwater and Braithwaite.

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Derwentwater is one of the principal bodies of water in the Lake District National Park in north west England. It lies wholly within the Borough of Allerdale, in the county of Cumbria.

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The lake occupies part of Borrowdale and lies immediately south of the town of Keswick. It is both fed and drained by theRiver Derwent. It measures approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) long by 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and is some 72 feet (22 m) deep. A regular passenger launch operates on the lake, running between Keswick and a number of drop off points and marinas around the area.

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There are several islands within the lake, one of which is inhabited. Derwent Island House, an 18th-century residence, is a tenanted National Trust property open to the public on five days each year.

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Indeed, Derwentwater is a place of considerable scenic value. It is surrounded by hills (known locally as fells), and many of the slopes facing Derwentwater are extensively wooded.
As for Keswick, its a great place for a stroll around, a cup of tea and a bit of shopping – especially if you are looking for outdoor wear or walking gear of any description.
Friar's amazing sweet shop

Friar’s amazing sweet shop

 

 

One of the highlights of any visit to keswick is a look around Friar’s sweet shop, with its amazing Christmas displays – where else can you find some chocolate lips for those all important stocking fillers?

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Was it worth the 220 mile drive to see these strange woodland laughing creatures?

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Of course it was……and where else could you find the finest sausages that England has to offer?

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More from me soon on these pages as I snap my way across the leafy North.