Category Archives: snow

Kaaresuvanto, Finland (Lapland)

 #OneImageOneDayOneLife

You will never go to a more amazing place than Lapland

I decided to spruce up my previous blog with some more images from this memorable trip, so this post is all about Kaaresuvanto, Finland (Lapland) one of the most beautiful places you will ever visit.

So before I knew it, I had added sixty eight images to be exact; I will now add some words to go with them!

We loved living in the middle of nowhere! Lapland, Finland, January 2013 Nikon D200, 10-24mm, 10mm, f3.5, 1/6 sec, ISO 1600

We loved living in the middle of nowhere!
Lapland, Finland, January 2013
Nikon D200, 10-24mm, 10mm, f3.5, 1/6 sec, ISO 1600

Kaaresuvanto, Finland (Lapland)

acording to wikipedia….

Kaaresuvanto (Northern Sami: Gárasavvon, Swedish: Karesuando) is a village in the Enontekiö municipality of the Lapland region in northern Finland, located on the Muonio River, which follows Finland’s western border with Sweden.

The village of Karesuando (part of Kiruna municipality) is located on the Swedish side of the river. According to Finnish tradition the two are considered parts of the same locality (with a population of about 470), although officially a national border bisects them. The sides are linked by a road bridge built in 1980. The area is traditionally Finnish and Sami speaking. After the Finnish War in 1809, the border was re-drawn for political reasons, not because of any cultural or linguistic reasons existing at that time. Later a cultural and language difference grew because of school and church influence.

The village got its first buildings in 1670, when Måns Mårtensson Karesuando, called “Hyvä Maunu Martinpoika” in Finnish and “Good Maunu, Son of Martti” in English, bought land from Sami Henrik Nilsson Nikkas. The vicar and botanist Lars Levi Laestadius worked in Kaaresuvanto where he founded the Laestadian revival movement named after him. In 1944 the area was burnt down by German troops during the Lapland War and had to be rebuilt.

Swedish Karesuando is the northernmost point on the major European route E45 to Gela in Italy, and Finnish Kaaresuvanto is a stop on European route E8 from Tromsø to Turku.

Kaaresuvanto, Finland (Lapland)

Kaaresuvanto, Finland (Lapland)

IMG_3253 IMG_3146 _DSC0240 _DSC0236 _DSC0238 IMG_3153 IMG_3158 _DSC0250 _DSC0259 _DSC0280 _DSC0281 _DSC0300 _DSC0306 IMG_3165 IMG_3166 _DSC0309 _DSC0328 _DSC0344 IMG_1580 _DSC0348 _DSC0351 IMG_3181 _DSC0365 IMG_3183 _DSC0367 _DSC0383 IMG_3195 IMG_3197 _DSC0411 _DSC0422 _DSC0424 _DSC0428 IMG_1593 _DSC0457 _DSC0476 _DSC0487 _DSC0488 _DSC0495 _DSC0500 _DSC0513 _DSC0517 _DSC0519 _DSC0523 IMG_3209 _DSC0528 _DSC0532 _DSC0534 _DSC0537 _DSC0543 _DSC0546 _DSC0547 _DSC0553 _DSC0556 IMG_3214 _DSC0582 IMG_3216 IMG_3221 IMG_3230 IMG_3232 IMG_3234 IMG_3237 IMG_3240 IMG_3242 IMG_3251

 

Even if you don’t track those funny lights down……….
just lay back in the snow, in your suit, and look up at the stars
we are just a speck on this earth

for more amazing snaps skip to my flickr feed for wall to wall ice and huskies

 

Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden

One of the best places in Yorkshire to spend any weekend…

Fountains Abbey National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992

Fountains Abbey
National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992

Beautiful conditions for a walk at Fountains Abbey this weekend, so we have been on both Saturday and Sunday to make the most of this lovely weather and take some snaps along the way – I don’t think anyone has taken photo’s here before!

The National Trust are managing a national treasure here!

Fountains Abbey National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992

Fountains Abbey
National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992

 

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

A lovely spot indeed, and what better way to get there than in a demonstrator Discovery from Land Rover Ripon – I really want one of these!

Land Rover Ripon lent me a Discovery for the morning - what a great vehicle!

Land Rover Ripon lent me a Discovery for the morning – what a great vehicle!

We walked our legs off around the deer park this weekend, taking in the beautiful scenery and amazing wildlife.

Sheep grazing on the walk don to the Abbey

Sheep grazing on the walk don to the Abbey

There is a lot to see for groups, with an activity centre, playground and picnic area, I can imagine returning in warmer weather to sit and watch the world go by.

L1001529

A great place for a school trip I should think – if only I was 40 years younger!

After descending the hill to the west entrance, the magnificent Fountains Hall can be visited.

Fountains Hall

Fountains Hall from the West Entrance

Fountains Hall

The house was built by Stephen Proctor between 1598 and 1604, partly with stone from the abbey ruins. It is an example of late Elizabethan architecture, perhaps influenced by the work of Robert Smythson. After Proctor’s death in 1619, Fountains Hall passed into the possession of the Messenger family, who sold it to William Aislabie of neighbouring Studley Royal 150 years later.[1] Fountains Hall became redundant as the Aislabie family remained at Studley Royal. It was leased to tenants and at one time parts of it were used for farm storage.

The hall was renovated and modernised between 1928 and 1931, and the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth) often stayed there as guests of Lady Doris Vyner, wife of the Marquess of Ripon and sister to the then-current Duke of Richmond and Gordon.

During the Second World War, Fountains Hall and other estate buildings were used to house evacuees. Studley Royal became the wartime home of Queen Ethelburga’s School from Harrogate and the school’s sanatorium was at Fountains Hall. The stable block and courtyard, was used for dormitories while one corner became the school chapel, at which Sunday Evensong was regularly said by the Archdeacon of Ripon. The hall has a balcony although it cannot be used because the staircase is considered unsafe for the public.

Fountains Hall in the winter sunshine

Fountains Hall in the winter sunshine

Fountains Hall in the winter sunshine

Fountains Hall contains some holiday homes let out by the National Trust

 The Vyner Family

Vyner Memorial Window in staircase

 

The Vyners lost a son and a daughter in the Second World War; Charles was a Royal Naval Reserve pilot missing in action near Rangoon. Elizabeth was a member of the Women’s Royal Naval Service and died of lethargic encephalitis while on service in Felixstowe, Suffolk. There is a sculpture remembering them which can be seen as one comes out of the house down the stone steps.

Elizabeth Vyner WRNS – Died on Active Service June 3rd 1942 Aged 18 years. Also her brother Charles De Grey Vyner Sub Lieut (A) RNVR Reported missing from Air Operations Off Rangoon May 2nd 1945 Aged 19 Years.

We will remember themWe will remember them

Once you have mavigated the Hall, it’s time for a cuppa and a look around the Mill – this is where the monks milled their wheat and contains many working models and a waterwheel.

Stop and have a look around the Mill

Stop and have a look around the Mill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then it’s time to walk around the Abbey, although you will not be alone if it’s a sunny day like today!

The Abbey from the Mill

The Abbey from the Mill

Fountains Abbey is one of the most photographed sites in England, for good reason.

Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, Saturday 31st January 2015 Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4 1/2,000 sec, ISO 800

Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire,
Saturday 31st January 2015
Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4
1/2,000 sec, ISO 800

Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains AbbeyBut there is a lot more to this place than the ruined Abbey.

The Water Garden at Studley Royal

Don't lose your footing walking across here

Don’t lose your footing walking across here

Beautiful

Beautiful

Pavillion in the water garden

Pavillion in the water garden

The water garden at Studley Royal created by John Aislabie in 1718 is one of the best surviving examples of a Georgian water garden in England. It was expanded by his son, William who purchased the adjacent Fountains Estate. The garden’s elegant ornamental lakes, canals, temples and cascades provide a succession of dramatic eye-catching vistas. It is also studded with a number of follies including a neo-Gothic castle and a palladian style banqueting house.

St Marys church in the Studley Royal Estate

The Anglican church of St Mary’s was the religious masterpiece of architect William Burges.

St Marys church

St Marys church

The richly decorated Victorian Gothic church was commissioned in 1870 by the first Marquess and Marchioness of Ripon to commemorate the Marchioness’ brother who had been allegedly murdered in Greece.

St Mary’s Church was one of two, late Victorian, memorial churches in Yorkshire, built by the family of the First Marquess of Ripon in memory of Frederick Grantham Vyner. The other is the Church of Christ the Consoler at Skelton-on-Ure, and the architect of both wasWilliam Burges. Vyner was murdered by Greek bandits in 1870 and his mother, Lady Mary Vyner, and sister, Lady Ripon, used the unspent ransom, gathered to obtain his release, to build two churches in Vyner’s memory on their respective Yorkshire estates. Burges’ appointment as architect was most likely due to the connection between his greatest patron, John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute and Vyner, who had been friends at Oxford. St Mary’s, on Lady Ripon’s estate at Studley Royal, was commissioned in 1870 and work began in 1871. The church was consecrated in 1878. As at Skelton, Burges’ design demonstrates a move from his favoured Early-French, to an English style.Pevsner writes of “a Victorian shrine, a dream of Early English glory.” The interior is spectacular, exceeding Skelton in richness and majesty. The stained glass is of particularly high quality. St Mary’s is Burges’ “ecclesiastical masterpiece.”[3]

So what is stopping you? I can’t recommend Fountains Abbey enough, have a look at the National Trust website and make some time to get there this year, I will finish with some more photos and I look forward to snapping more deer and the open spaces for my next visit to Studley Royal.

Water gardens of Studley Royal, Fountains Abbey Saturday 31st January 2015 Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4 1/1,000 sec, ISO 800

Water gardens of Studley Royal, Fountains Abbey
Saturday 31st January 2015
Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4
1/1,000 sec, ISO 800

Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey

Chair in grounds of Fountains Abbey, Studley Royal

Chair in grounds of Fountains Abbey, Studley Royal

Multi colours at Fountains Abbey

Multi colours at Fountains Abbey

Multi colours at Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

 

 

OK, I could not resist including some of my photos from a visit earlier in Autumn 2014, and Boxing Day also…thanks for reading and let me have your comments.

 

Jungfrau Railway, Switzerland

On a Great Rail Tour of Europe in the summer of 2013, we were lucky enough to take the Jungfraubahn cog railway to the Jungfrau railway station at 3,454 m (11,332 ft.), the highest railway (and station) in Europe.L1001300

L1001294

To see more pictures, take a look on my Jungfrau flickr stream
This is an amazing journey, even if you don’t really like trains – the engineering feat, constructed well over 100 years ago is a truly outstanding achievement; and one that Michael Portillo and millions of tourists have marvelled at for many a year.

IMG_4550

In 1893 Adolf Guyer-Zeller conceived of the idea for a railway tunnel to the Jungfraujoch to make the glaciated areas on the south more accessible.

The building of the tunnel took 16 years and the summit station was not opened before 1912. The goal was in fact to reach the summit of the Jungfrau with an elevator from the highest railway station inside the mountain.

L1001337 L1001328 IMG_4562

The complete project was not realized because of the outbreak of the World War I.

Somehow the 07.55 am Trans-Pennine Express to Leeds has now lost some of its allure, this was a proper train for proper mountains, and the scenery is nothing short of breath-taking!

The train into the mountain leaves from Kleine Scheidegg, which can be reached by trains from Grindelwald and Lauterbrunnen via Wengen. The train enters the tunnel running eastward through the Eiger shortly above Kleine Scheidegg.

Before arriving at the Jungfraujoch, it stops for a few minutes at two other stations, Eigerwand
(on the north face of the Eiger) and Eismeer (on the south side), where passengers can
see through the holes excavated from the mountain.

L1001314 L1001335 IMG_4571

The journey from Kleine Scheidegg to Jungfraujoch takes approximately 50 minutes including the stops; the downhill return journey taking only 35 minutes.

A large complex of tunnels and buildings has been constructed at the Jungfraujoch, mostly into the south side of the Mönch.
There is a hotel, two restaurants, an observatory, a research station, a small cinema, a ski school, and the “Ice Palace”, a collection of elaborate ice sculptures

Another tunnel leads outside to a flat, snow-covered area, where one can walk around and look down to the Konkordiaplatz and the Aletsch Glacier, as well as the surrounding mountains.


L1001344
L1001327 L1001326 L1001322 L1001315 L1001308 L1001291 IMG_4548 L1001429 L1001414 L1001404 L1001398 L1001369 L1001361 L1001348 L1001335 L1001326 L1001314 L1001303 L1001297 L1001296 IMG_4566 IMG_4542 IMG_4539 IMG_1979

We had an amazing day out here, returning to Interlaken in the evening with memories that will stay with us for a very long time.

I would urge everyone who goes to Switzerland to do this trip, and take a jumper!