One man and his dog

We were invited to our old neighbours birthday party back in Cheshire a long time ago; the date finally arrived and our stay in Bollington proved to be special in many ways.
These pictures of one man and his dog are for you, Mike!

One man and his dog
One man and his dog

One man and his dog

We wish you a very happy 70th birthday, it was so good to see you and celebrate the the ‘three score and ten’ landmark.

Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking...
Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking…

One man and his dog
One man and his dog
One man and his dog
One man and his dog

and big love to all of our lovely ex-neighbours!

Johny & Christina
Johny & Christina
Chris and Chris
Chris and Chris
Mike, Tish and Sweep
Mike, Tish and Sweep
Sue and John
Sue and John
Alex and Kate
Alex and Kate

Well done to Tansy, Tish and Sue and John for all your hard work!

Tansy and Peter
Tansy and Peter

70 is the new 50
70 is the new 50

Thanks for a great party, the best hosts, fantastic food, the dogs running around and enough drink to sink a battleship!

One man and his dog
One man and his dog

But most of all, love to you Mike (and George who would have been watching down on us) and all our ex-neighbours; we won’t leave it another two years before retuning to Happy Valley!

 

Bollington, Cheshire

Bollington. This is where we lived for the last sixteen years, a fantastic town in East Cheshire, set 20 miles south of Manchester, near Macclesfield, but not really near anywhere; a splendid place to raise a family, go for a walk, own a dog, and preferably, do all three (I never got the dog).

According to Wikipedia…
Bollington is a small town and civil parish in the county of Cheshire (County Palatine of Chester), England, in the unitary authority of Cheshire East,to the east of Prestbury.

In the Middle Ages it was part of the Earl of Chester‘s manor of Macclesfield, and the ancient parish of Prestbury.

According to the 2001 UK census, Bollington had a population of 7,095 (7593 in 2011 census), it certainly has too many cars, and I should think not enough affordable housing.

Bollington, which is locally nicknamed “Happy Valley”, is on the River Dean and the Macclesfield Canal, on the south-western edge of the Peak District.

Rising above the town is Kerridge Hill that is surmounted by White Nancy, a monument built to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo in the Napoleonic Wars.

The helpful man walking to the right below is setting off to that very landmark……a spot we have all climber to thousands of times over the years!

Bollington is beautiful, I will add to these snaps over the years as I go through my files, but here are a few to get you started – walking up the hills towards Kerridge at the back of our house, after a bad day, you can be walking in lovely fresh air within minutes.

Lyme Park, Cheshire

For more pictures go to my flickr stream

Lyme Park House
Lyme Park House

Here is a beautiful place in monochrome, some of the first photos taken on my Leica in May 2013; a nice walk with my equally beautiful wife.

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According to Wikipedia…

Lyme Park is a large estate located south of DisleyCheshire. The estate is managed by the National Trust and consists of a mansion house surrounded by formal gardens, in a deer park in the Peak District National Park.[1] The house is the largest in Cheshire,[2] and is designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building.[3]

The estate was granted to Sir Thomas Danyers in 1346 and passed to the Leghs of Lyme by marriage in 1388. It remained in the possession of the Legh family until 1946 when it was given to the National Trust. The house dates from the latter part of the 16th century. Modifications were made to it in the 1720s by Giacomo Leoni, who retained some of the Elizabethan features and added others, particularly the courtyard and the south range. It is difficult to classify Leoni’s work at Lyme, as it contains elements of both Palladian and Baroque styles.[a] Further modifications were made by Lewis Wyatt in the 19th century, especially to the interior. Formal gardens were created and developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The house, gardens and park have been used as locations for filming and they are open to the public. The Lyme Caxton Missal is on display in the Library.

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The most obvious structure in the park, other than the house, is a tower called the Cage which stands on a hill to the east of the approach road to the house (53.34453°N 2.05189°W). It was originally a hunting lodge and was later used as a park-keeper’s cottage and as a lock-up for prisoners. The first structure on the site was built about 1580; this was taken down and rebuilt in 1737, possibly to a design by Leoni for Peter Legh X. The tower is built in buff sandstonerubble with ashlar sandstone dressings. It is square in plan, in three storeys, with attached small square towers surmounted by cupolas at the corners. The Cage is a Grade II* listed building.[25]

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Lyme Park House
Lyme Park House

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Shutlingsloe, Cheshire

Shutlingsloe, Cheshire

Shutlingsloe is a hill we climb (walk up) on the first Sunday of every month in 2014, rain or shine

…or it was, until we moved to Yorkshire!

 
According to Wikepedia…
Shutlingsloe is a hill near the village of Wildboarclough, in the east of the county of Cheshire. It stands to the south of Macclesfield Forest, on the edge of the Peak District and within the Peak District National Park.

A steep-sided hill with a distinctive profile, sometimes described as the ‘Matterhorn of Cheshire’, it is the third highest peak in the county (Shining Tor being the highest and Whetstone Ridge second highest) with an elevation of 506 m (1,660 ft), and commands excellent views over Cheshire.

5th January 2014
Freezing, wet and rainy
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The name derives from old English ‘Scyttel’s hlaw’ meaning ‘Scyttel’s (personal name) hill’ and is one of several ‘low’ names in the Peak District, from the same Old English root that gives rise to the name “Law” for many hills in southern Scotland.

#2
Sunday 2nd February 2014

Sunny, cold and breezy
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#3
Saturday22nd February 2014
sunny and bright, up a little bit early this month with family
beautiful as ever
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#4
Sunday 13th April 2014
sunny and bright, missed out in March, so made it up here for 4th visit of year on a windy Sunday, weekend before Easter. just the two of us, nice and quit!
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Sadly, the truth of it is, we have not been up there since the 13th of April.
A lot can happen in 7 months, indeed, it has – and we therefore need to find our new Shutlingsloe for 2015 and stick 100% to the task this time, I think we can do this; no more moving house, no more complicated weekends, no more living with a cat on my head.
we are all free to explore…