Last days of 2016

Now we are counting down the last days of 2016. So I went out with my camera in daylight and at night to catch the beauty that is all around us in North Yorkshire.

Frost crunching underfoot and gripping the trees

Thousands of stars in the sky

Crisp cold air and freezing breath

Its all here, and it will still be here in 3 days time when it’s 2017.

 

Stag of North Stainley

I love the Stag of North Stainley; a sculpture constructed entirely of bicycle parts, creating our village symbol, the Stag of North Stainley and the Staveley family; made by local folk to celebrate the Tour de France passing through the village in 2014.

The Stag of North Stainley comes alive at Christmas time with a red nose and the village Christmas tree lit up in close proximity.

Stag of North Stainley

Thought you may like some snaps I took of the Stag of North Stainley today.

 

 

Wensleydale day out

The sun was shining and the wind was blowing, Masham sheep fair had been ticked off and it was a Sunday; it was time for a Wensleydale day out.

Bolton Castle always offers some amazing photographic opportunities; so this time we ventured into the castle as well as out and about walking between Aysgarth falls, Redmire and the surrounding lower Wensleydale rolling dale.

Looking towards Pen Hill, Lower Wensleydale from Bolton Castle
Looking towards Pen Hill, Lower Wensleydale from Bolton Castle

What a great place to visit, if you live round the corner like us, or you are coming from farther afield – Wensleydale is absolutely beautiful, unspoilt and full of interesting history.

Bolton Castle, Wensleydale
Bolton Castle, the perfect place to start a Wensleydale day out.

It’s not the first time I have featured Castle Bolton, bit on a sunny day like this, there is no better place to be with my Leica.

I hope you like my pictures.

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Ripley Show gets better every year

Last year we went to Ripley Show for the first time, it was fantastic and we made a date for the calendar to be there again in 2016.

Ripley Show gets better every year.

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Well that date arrived, faster than you can say ‘organic produce’ so we packed up our picnic and made the most of another beautiful Yorkshire day; and I am proud to report that Ripley Show gets better every year.

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There’s something for everyone at Ripley Show

The cattle this year were amazing, this beautiful Aberdeen Angus was my favourite beast of the whole show, majestic and absolutely huge!

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The animals are great, especially the pigs and sheep, but the tractors and assorted old machinery are also well worth a look including the carriage driving and vintage cars.

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No excuse for many similar pictures to last year!

– all in a all great day out, Ripley Show gets better every year!

Ripley Show gets better every year
Ripley Show gets better every year

Well done to all the organisers, exhibitors and competitors.

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2017 is already in the diary.

Studley Royal rutting

Everybody is out this weekend looking to photograph some Studley Royal rutting.

Seeing some Studley Royal rutting yesterday was the high point of a man-flu laden weekend. A short walk on an autumnal Sunday in this majestic space was a lovely way to get some fresh air and see the beautiful deer inhabitants of this great park.

Studley Royal Deer
Studley Royal Deer

Lots of deer on view as well as all the best Autumn has to offer, some words below from the NT website.

Autumn at Fountains Abbey & Studley Royal

 © Richard Jemison

Autumn has arrived with an explosion of colour in the garden and deer park at Fountains Abbey & Studley Royal in North Yorkshire. Known for its autumn colour, the grounds are breath-taking each autumn, and this year is no exception.

The months of October and November are perfect for a walk through the acres of red, orange, gold and green woodland which surrounds the ponds and canals of the Georgian Water Garden. Run through the crunchy fallen leaves, find the biggest conkers and acorns, and discover some fantastic fungi from shaggy inkcaps to chicken of the woods!

Use one of our wildlife spotter sheets to discover birds that make the estate their winter home, spot which deer is which by the colour of their rumps, and take a look inside a fallen tree to see what bugs you can discover.

Please remember that during the months of October, November and December it is the annual deer rut in the park. The mating season can make the male stags and bucks aggressive and territorial so make sure you keep your distance and do not approach the deer.

We’re open every day apart from Fridays in November, December and January.

The daddy sits on his own
The daddy sits on his own

 

Oh deer…. here are my more inferior snaps

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/fountains-abbey/wildlife/

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Studley Royal Deer
Studley Royal Deer

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The daddy sits on his own
The daddy sits on his own

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Ripley Castle in Monochrome

Ripley Castle in Monochrome
Ripley Castle in Monochrome

We popped to Ripley Casttle this afternoon and took some simple mono images, I hope you like them.

Ripley Castle in Monochrome.

I was messing around with mono filters and so have some different types of contract – let me know what you think?

Ripley Castle is a lovely spot, OK it’s a honey pot for tourists, but the guide was excellent and the gardens and deer paark are a joy; I just can’t wait for next year’s show….

http://www.ripleycastle.co.uk/

From their own website – Ripley Castle and Gardens, situated 3 miles from Harrogate in North Yorkshire on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, is an historic attraction open to the public all year round and makes for a fascinating and entertaining day out, in a beautiful location.

The Castle also makes the perfect setting for any corporate entertaining event whether it be a meeting or dinner. The setting is stunning, the service is friendly and efficient, and the catering is exceptional.

So here are my pictures, all taken on a rather overcast Sunday afternoon on a Leica M type 240, with Summilux 50mm 1:1.4 ASPH lens at ISO 800

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Nunnington Hall is fabulous!

Entrance to Nunnington Hall
Entrance to Nunnington Hall

Nunnington Hall is fabulous!

Nunnington Hall is fabulous!
Nunnington Hall is fabulous!

Nunnington Hall is a proper great day out for all the family – on a recent visit we reflected that we have not been back here for about 20 years; while the the children are all grown up now, there is still so much to do for a couple of empty nesters!

Something for everyone at Nunnington Hall
Something for everyone at Nunnington Hall

Nunnington Hall has beautuful gardens that have something for everyone

Lovely wild frowers at Nunnington Hall
Lovely wild frowers at Nunnington Hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Famed for its picturesque location, organic walled garden with spring-flowering meadows, flamboyant resident peacocks and a changing programme of exclusive and high profile art and photography exhibitions, Nunnington Hall offers something for everyone to enjoy.

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/nunnington-hall/

There is a lot of stuff for kids in the grounds and gardens – especially liked the working ‘cutting’ garden part with a mud pie kitchen and potting sheds for the children.

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The male and femaale scarcrows in the cutting garden are a sight to behold!

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Wild flowers provide a home for all the insects and butterflies, some of which are amazing even on a rather overcast last day of August.

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The peacocks roam free in the grounds, both males and female with her two little chicks tucked under the wing for safety.

Mother Peacock at Nunnington Hall
Mother Peacock at Nunnington Hall

 

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One of the highlights is the amazing Carlisle Collection of miniature rooms on the top floor – these incredibly complex room sets were put together with such skill it is hard upon examination to differentiate them from the real thing – I took some pictures below of the study, the nursery and one of the sitting rooms.

Carlisle Collection at Nunnington Hall
Carlisle Collection at Nunnington Hall
The Nursery - Carlisle Collection at Nunnington Hall
The Nursery – Carlisle Collection at Nunnington Hall

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The National Trust have a changing programme of exhibitions in our Top Floor Gallery. This year including, the British Wildlife Photography awards, World War One Centenary, Children’s Illustration, Matt the Daily Telegraph Cartoonist and a new feature – Art for Christmas.

Inside the house there is a lot to see

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And outside, the walled gardens include a lovely open tea room area as well as the riverbank and lawns with ample spots for picnics and easy access to the grounds from an adjoining carpark via a small footbridge over the river.

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All in all a great day out on the edge of the North Yorkshire Moors National Park and away from the tourist traps of Kirbymoorside and Helmsley.

Well Done National Trust – nothing changes in 20 years, and that is a good thing!

Easy to get to via the A170 in North Norkshire
Easy to get to via the A170 in North Norkshire

Usha Gap base camp

Camped with our mates in Swaledale again last weekend at this fantastic campsite.

Usha Gap camp site is a winner, even when it rains!
Usha Gap camp site is a winner, even when it rains!

Usha Gap base camp

The weather was horrific, but when did that ever stop anyone having a good time?

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Campfires, wine and some nice steaks on the barbeque – so no worries re a damp night under canvas, this is the place to be!

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And when it stops raining you can take a lovely 5 mile walk up and down Upper Swaledale, taking in Muker and other villages; there is always the ‘Farmers Arms’ in Muker – a 10 minute walk away if you can’t face getting the washing up done.

Usha Gap is a great camp site – no electricity, you are back to nature and near some nice new toilet and washing up blocks on a family run friendly site in deepest North Yorkshire dales.

What ids not to love?

Book here…..http://www.ushagap.co.uk/

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Cornfields of Well & Snape

I popped out with my camera to go for a pint and take some early evening snaps of the beautiful countryside.

Cornfields of Well & Snape

I discovered the cornfields around Well and Snape; two small villages near Bedale.

I never got the pint.

Cornfield
Cornfield

 

Cornfields of Well & Snape
Cornfields of Well & Snape
Cornfields of Well & Snape
Cornfields of Well & Snape

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Muker, Swaledale

Muker, Swaledale is one of the most beautiful places you could wish to visit. Located at grid reference SD910978, on the banks of the Straw Beck near its confluence with the River Swale, at one time a centre for lead mining, the main economic activities are now woollen clothing, tourism and sheep farming.

Famous now of course for the first stage of the Tour de France, which whizzed through in July 2014 on the first stage of the race, having dropped down into Swaledale through Buttertubs pass.

In the village, the pub is the Farmers Arms, and does a great pint of Black Sheep. Muker also has a village shop as well as craft shops and a café. Originally the Vicarage, the Muker village tea shop was built in 1680 and retains much of its ‘Olde worlde charm’ today. A Park Information Point for the Yorkshire Dales National Park can be found at the Muker Village store.

Here are some shots from the weekend spent camping at Usha Gap campsite, well worth a trip at any time of the year, we will be back soon.

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Usha Gap campsite, Muker, Swaledale North Yorkshire May 2015 Leica M (type 240) Summilux-M 1:1.4/50 ASPH. f4.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 200
Usha Gap campsite, Muker, Swaledale
North Yorkshire May 2015
Leica M (type 240) Summilux-M 1:1.4/50 ASPH. f4.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 200

A bit about Muker from Wikipedia…

The traditional late 18th and early 19th century barns and drystone walls of Swaledale are the most characteristic feature of the landscape. The flower-rich hay meadows around Muker are of international importance and are carefully protected. Farmers receive grants which allow them to farm the land by traditional methods, without using artificial fertilizers.

Muker is also home to the Muker Silver Band, a brass band formed in 1897.[6] The band, which recently celebrated its hundredth anniversary, is now one of the last surviving bands in Swaledale and Wensleydale, and still maintains a busy calendar of public appearances.

York station

I like York station; it takes me back to my childhood.

The first York railway station was a temporary wooden building on Queen Street outside the walls of the city, opened in 1839 by the York and North Midland Railway.

It was succeeded in 1841, inside the walls, by what is now York old railway station. In due course, the irksome requirement that through trains between London and Newcastle needed to reverse out of the old York station to continue their journey necessitated the construction of a new through station outside the walls.

York station has an amazing roof
York station has an amazing roof

This was the present station, designed by the North Eastern Railway architects Thomas Prosser and William Peachey, which opened in 1877. It had 13 platforms and was at that time the largest station in the world.

At one time the largest station in the world
At one time the largest station in the world

As part of the new station project, the Royal Station Hotel (now The Royal York Hotel), designed by Peachey, opened in 1878. In 1909 new platforms were added, and in 1938 the current footbridge was built and the station resignalled.

The building was heavily bombed during the Second World War.[1]

On one occasion, on 29 April 1942,[2] 800 passengers had to be evacuated from a Kings Cross-Edinburgh train which arrived during a bombing raid.[1]On the same night, two railway workers were killed, one being station foreman William Milner (born 1900[2]), who died after returning to his burning office to collect his first aid kit.

 

He was posthumously awarded the King’s commendation for gallantry.[2] A plaque in his memory has been erected at the station.[1][2]

The station was extensively repaired in 1947.

I first went there as a baby in 1963, there was always a big Christmas tree and presents for everyone underneath it.

Of course it’s a lot busier now, and not how I remember it, but it still has that magnificent roof that always brings me back, and with a wider lens I could really do it justice.

Brimham Rocks

Brimham Rocks.

It always sounded good as a kid, and having returned today probably for the first time in 30+ years, it was just as good as it sounds, in fact, it was better than it ever was.

The National Trust have scored a bullseye here

Brinmam Rocks, as good as ever 30 years on...
Brinmam Rocks, as good as ever 30 years on…

Brimham Rocks are balancing rock formations on Brimham Moor in North Yorkshire, England. The rocks stand at a height of nearly 30 metres in an area owned by the National Trust which is part of the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Wikipedia

They can be found here – Ripon Road Barn Blazefield, Pateley Bridge, Ripon, Yorkshire HG3 4DW

Honestly, i have not been for so long they really amazed me today – a fantastic 2 mile walk around the edge of the moor, away from the crowds, there are some amazing rocks and the views across Nidderdale is awesome.

Here are 20 photos that should get you interested – everyone should go!

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Brinmam Rocks, as good as ever 30 years on...
Brinmam Rocks, as good as ever 30 years on…

Beningbrough Hall and Gardens

Beningbrough Hall is a great day out!
#OneImageOneDayOneLife

Beningbrough Hall and Gardens as seen through the huge wooden NT pictureframe
Beningbrough Hall and Gardens as seen through the huge wooden NT pictureframe

 

 

Beningbrough Hall and Gardens

Glorious gardens surround this baroque mansion with National Portrait Gallery paintings – ands it’s number 2 of 18 National Trust locations we will visit in Yorkshire this year.

From the National Trust website

Inspired by his Grand Tour, John Bourchier created Beningbrough , an Italian Palace nestled between York, Harrogate and Leeds. The impressive rooms are a perfect backdrop for the rich collection of portraits on loan from the National Portrait Gallery, Beningbrough’s long-term partner. The paintings feature people who have made, and are making, British history and culture, and in 2015 include contemporary portraits in a display of ‘Royals: then and now’.

A working walled garden, grand herbaceous borders, sweeping lawns and a play area for children to let off steam, creates a year-round garden. Picture-postcard views can be seen from the garden and the parkland offers opportunities to explore riverside walks, ancient trees and discover hidden wildlife.

The stable block and shop at Beningborough hall
The stable block and shop at Beningborough hall

Beningborough Hall

The farm shop at Beningborough Hall
The farm shop at Beningborough Hall

Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden

One of the best places in Yorkshire to spend any weekend…

Fountains Abbey National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992
Fountains Abbey
National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992

Beautiful conditions for a walk at Fountains Abbey this weekend, so we have been on both Saturday and Sunday to make the most of this lovely weather and take some snaps along the way – I don’t think anyone has taken photo’s here before!

The National Trust are managing a national treasure here!

Fountains Abbey National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992
Fountains Abbey
National Trust Visitor Centre, built 1992

 

Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey

A lovely spot indeed, and what better way to get there than in a demonstrator Discovery from Land Rover Ripon – I really want one of these!

Land Rover Ripon lent me a Discovery for the morning - what a great vehicle!
Land Rover Ripon lent me a Discovery for the morning – what a great vehicle!

We walked our legs off around the deer park this weekend, taking in the beautiful scenery and amazing wildlife.

Sheep grazing on the walk don to the Abbey
Sheep grazing on the walk don to the Abbey

There is a lot to see for groups, with an activity centre, playground and picnic area, I can imagine returning in warmer weather to sit and watch the world go by.

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A great place for a school trip I should think – if only I was 40 years younger!

After descending the hill to the west entrance, the magnificent Fountains Hall can be visited.

Fountains Hall
Fountains Hall from the West Entrance

Fountains Hall

The house was built by Stephen Proctor between 1598 and 1604, partly with stone from the abbey ruins. It is an example of late Elizabethan architecture, perhaps influenced by the work of Robert Smythson. After Proctor’s death in 1619, Fountains Hall passed into the possession of the Messenger family, who sold it to William Aislabie of neighbouring Studley Royal 150 years later.[1] Fountains Hall became redundant as the Aislabie family remained at Studley Royal. It was leased to tenants and at one time parts of it were used for farm storage.

The hall was renovated and modernised between 1928 and 1931, and the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth) often stayed there as guests of Lady Doris Vyner, wife of the Marquess of Ripon and sister to the then-current Duke of Richmond and Gordon.

During the Second World War, Fountains Hall and other estate buildings were used to house evacuees. Studley Royal became the wartime home of Queen Ethelburga’s School from Harrogate and the school’s sanatorium was at Fountains Hall. The stable block and courtyard, was used for dormitories while one corner became the school chapel, at which Sunday Evensong was regularly said by the Archdeacon of Ripon. The hall has a balcony although it cannot be used because the staircase is considered unsafe for the public.

Fountains Hall in the winter sunshine
Fountains Hall in the winter sunshine
Fountains Hall in the winter sunshine
Fountains Hall contains some holiday homes let out by the National Trust

 The Vyner Family

Vyner Memorial Window in staircase

 

The Vyners lost a son and a daughter in the Second World War; Charles was a Royal Naval Reserve pilot missing in action near Rangoon. Elizabeth was a member of the Women’s Royal Naval Service and died of lethargic encephalitis while on service in Felixstowe, Suffolk. There is a sculpture remembering them which can be seen as one comes out of the house down the stone steps.

Elizabeth Vyner WRNS – Died on Active Service June 3rd 1942 Aged 18 years. Also her brother Charles De Grey Vyner Sub Lieut (A) RNVR Reported missing from Air Operations Off Rangoon May 2nd 1945 Aged 19 Years.

We will remember themWe will remember them

Once you have mavigated the Hall, it’s time for a cuppa and a look around the Mill – this is where the monks milled their wheat and contains many working models and a waterwheel.

Stop and have a look around the Mill
Stop and have a look around the Mill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then it’s time to walk around the Abbey, although you will not be alone if it’s a sunny day like today!

The Abbey from the Mill
The Abbey from the Mill

Fountains Abbey is one of the most photographed sites in England, for good reason.

Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, Saturday 31st January 2015 Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4 1/2,000 sec, ISO 800
Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire,
Saturday 31st January 2015
Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4
1/2,000 sec, ISO 800

Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains AbbeyBut there is a lot more to this place than the ruined Abbey.

The Water Garden at Studley Royal

Don't lose your footing walking across here
Don’t lose your footing walking across here
Beautiful
Beautiful
Pavillion in the water garden
Pavillion in the water garden

The water garden at Studley Royal created by John Aislabie in 1718 is one of the best surviving examples of a Georgian water garden in England. It was expanded by his son, William who purchased the adjacent Fountains Estate. The garden’s elegant ornamental lakes, canals, temples and cascades provide a succession of dramatic eye-catching vistas. It is also studded with a number of follies including a neo-Gothic castle and a palladian style banqueting house.

St Marys church in the Studley Royal Estate

The Anglican church of St Mary’s was the religious masterpiece of architect William Burges.

St Marys church
St Marys church

The richly decorated Victorian Gothic church was commissioned in 1870 by the first Marquess and Marchioness of Ripon to commemorate the Marchioness’ brother who had been allegedly murdered in Greece.

St Mary’s Church was one of two, late Victorian, memorial churches in Yorkshire, built by the family of the First Marquess of Ripon in memory of Frederick Grantham Vyner. The other is the Church of Christ the Consoler at Skelton-on-Ure, and the architect of both wasWilliam Burges. Vyner was murdered by Greek bandits in 1870 and his mother, Lady Mary Vyner, and sister, Lady Ripon, used the unspent ransom, gathered to obtain his release, to build two churches in Vyner’s memory on their respective Yorkshire estates. Burges’ appointment as architect was most likely due to the connection between his greatest patron, John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute and Vyner, who had been friends at Oxford. St Mary’s, on Lady Ripon’s estate at Studley Royal, was commissioned in 1870 and work began in 1871. The church was consecrated in 1878. As at Skelton, Burges’ design demonstrates a move from his favoured Early-French, to an English style.Pevsner writes of “a Victorian shrine, a dream of Early English glory.” The interior is spectacular, exceeding Skelton in richness and majesty. The stained glass is of particularly high quality. St Mary’s is Burges’ “ecclesiastical masterpiece.”[3]

So what is stopping you? I can’t recommend Fountains Abbey enough, have a look at the National Trust website and make some time to get there this year, I will finish with some more photos and I look forward to snapping more deer and the open spaces for my next visit to Studley Royal.

Water gardens of Studley Royal, Fountains Abbey Saturday 31st January 2015 Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4 1/1,000 sec, ISO 800
Water gardens of Studley Royal, Fountains Abbey
Saturday 31st January 2015
Leica M, Summilux 1:1.4/50mm ASPH, f3.4
1/1,000 sec, ISO 800

Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey Fountains Abbey

Chair in grounds of Fountains Abbey, Studley Royal
Chair in grounds of Fountains Abbey, Studley Royal
Multi colours at Fountains Abbey
Multi colours at Fountains Abbey

Multi colours at Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey
Fountains Abbey

 

 

OK, I could not resist including some of my photos from a visit earlier in Autumn 2014, and Boxing Day also…thanks for reading and let me have your comments.

 

Ilkley, Yorkshire

Ilkley, Yorkshire

Some friends have moved to Ilkley, and it may just be one of THE best places to live in the UK.

Ilkley Moor is part of Rombalds Moor, the moorland between Ilkley and Keighley inWest Yorkshire, England. The moor, which rises to 402 m (1,319 ft) above sea level is famous as the inspiration for the Yorkshire “county anthem” On Ilkla Moor Baht ‘at. (Wikipedia)

If you are looking for a town that has everything, you have children and preferably at least one dog, then Ilkley is a great place to be.

In addition, you will need a disposable income that enables you to visit Betty’s Tea Rooms at least once a week, and a love of food, and real Yorkshire ale.

 

One year on, and It’s great to see that Ilkley is as popular as ever, Wharfedale is a fantastic place to live, and Ilkley is the jewel in the crown with its own rail link to Leeds (unlike Ripon), amazing scenery, propper shops and a booming property scene.

 

Bridlington, the land that time forgot

 

Bridlington Harbour
Bridlington Harbour

Bridlington; the land that time forgot

A place I have visited so many times, as a kid, as a grown-up, a brother, a son, an uncle and a silly old man with a rangefinder camera; Bridlington is inextricably linked to my family; it is a place that evokes strong memories and continues to divide loyalties with so many conflicting views on the land that time forgot.

Not always open to outsiders...
Not always open…

Bridlington is not always viewed favourably and is seen at best as ‘a cultural magnet to the rich and famous’ indeed you could argue that it fully deserves the title Bridlington; the land that time forgot.

http://www.timeout.com/travel/features/595/britains-other-best-towns. Once home to the largest Lada car park in Western Europe, Bridlington now has a world-class marina only a few feet from a medieval old town jammed with convivial hostelries. Alan Bennett comes here for fish and chips in the shadow of Flamborough Head’s chalk cliffs and David Hockney is in residence. Hockney’s recent paintings of the Yorkshire Wolds publicised the area’s understated beauty.

The land that time forgot
The land that time forgot

and at worst as ‘The Chav Capital of the UK’

http://www.ilivehere.co.uk/bridlington-chav-capital-of-the-uk-without-doubt.html. A random patchwork of violent council estates and traveller sites by the murky waters of the North Sea makes this town one of the worst places to live in England even before the extra bonus of the entire Giro cashing population of Hull, Sheffield & Doncaster (three of the nastiest towns in the north) decamping here for the summer months.

Whatever the view, and whatever the weather, Bridlington is an amazing place to take some photos that truly reflect the state our nation has got itself into. I will let my Leica and the sea breeze do the talking.

windswept cafe down by the harbour; Bridlington, the land that time forgot
windswept cafe down by the harbour; Bridlington, the land that time forgot
A mobilty scooter is almost obligatory; Bridlington, the land that time forgot
A mobilty scooter is almost obligatory; Bridlington, the land that time forgot
The statistics show that Bridlington is home to a higher level of older individuals, many of whom depend on the state - and have health issues out of kilter with better off areas of the UK.
The statistics show that Bridlington is home to a higher level of older individuals, many of whom depend on the state – and have health issues out of kilter with better off areas of the UK.

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Not always open to outsiders...
Not always open to outsiders…

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The land that time forgot
The land that time forgot

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Let me have your views on my photos and these comments, good and bad, I would love to compare notes on this rarest of places.

 

Autumn in Ripon

L1000336Its nice in Ripon, we moved here three weeks ago and are just getting to grips with the landscape, the people and the geography.

Moving back to Yorkshire is the best thing we ever did, here are some photos from walking around the region this weekend

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The countryside around North Stainley is beautiful, I will be adding to these images as winter sets in and we make the most of the magnificent North Yorkshire countryside!

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Tour de France, North Stainley

North Stainley is a place I could see myself living in. A small  Trumpton-like village four miles north of Ripon on the A6108, it has a lot going for it.

A couple of recent trips have left me feeling that this is a propper community where everyone is propper Yorkshire; friendly and helpfull. The seem to be happy families, a relatively solid and stable population, and a lot of things to do in the surrounding area.

This is a village that looks a bit like Trumpton with many new houses arranged around a cricket pitch, village hall, church of England school and church. We first visited in June 2014 and then came back to camp at Lightwater Valley theme park, situated next door to the village and join in the fun as the Tour de France passed through on the 1st day of the tour en route from le Grande Depart in Leeds to a Harrogate finish on the Stray.

There will be more pictures once I update my blog.

West Tanfield

Beautiful Ripon

We have been camping again, following a great trip to Lightwater Valley while the tour was on, we have now returned and camped at Woodhouse Valley Farm, near Grantley, Ripon. It looked close by on the map, but needed an extreme off road cross-country expedition to find!

Yummy
Yummy

The purpose of these trips has been to get in with the locals and find where to potentially buy a house – and finally move back to Yorkshire.

Getting a good breakfast is key to the camping experience!
Getting a good breakfast is key to the camping experience!

So what better way to get back into the swing of things, than to pitch up a small tent, get out your folding table and fry up some bacon and eggs, while reading the Ripon Gazette

Once you have had five coffees and the first roll-up of the day, then clearly it is time to pack up, get out and do battle – and that means heading into town on two wheels or four, the choice is yours.

Ripon is a city with an amazing cathedral and a propper working market square, the centre for all commercial and social activity. There is always something going on, a band playing, a fair, a market, or a protest or celebration of some sort.

Better grab a sausage roll from Greggs and a coffee from Costa, and just sit back and do some people watching.

Ripon Brass Band playing in the market square
Ripon Brass Band playing in the market square

On seperate weekends in June and July we have found ourselves caught up in both the Armed Forces Day and the festival of St. Wilfred, founder of the cathedral, when he and his monks are paraded through Ripon town centre, followed by an array of floats, bands and local dignatories.

I will upload some pictures at a later date.

Wensleydale capers

Upper Wensleydale view
We headed off into deepest Yorkshire in February for some Wensleydale Capers…

In Hawes, the Wensleydale creamery really is a great day out with something to do for everyone, great walking country from Hawes, again visiting various sites where the tour de France will be coming later this year, the Yorkshire dales at their best.

The Wensleydale railway from Leyburn
From Hawes starting a10 mile circular walk along the Pennine Way, taking in the ancient Green Dragon Pub and famous Hardraw Force waterfall.

Following a creamy pint of Timothy Taylor’s Landlord ale, you gain access through the pub to the amazing waterfall at the rear.

Leyburn

A bustling market town, supporting many shops, pubs and restaurants. The centre of the community for us was Richardson’s fine food store, with everything from local grown vegetables and well-butchered meat, to every shade of Yorkshire cheese, a vast array of everyday groceries, and a fine upstairs wine department that could put Waitrose to shame

 

A 2002 Chateau Grand Puy Lacoste Pauillac did the trick accompanying some lovely local lamb cutlets, sealing the deal on a most enjoyable trip